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O'Dowling Dowling Dowley

Although the Dowlings are one of the "Seven Septs of Leix", some of the ancient historians state with some certainty that they share a common descent with the Murphy and Kinsella septs, their ancestor being Eanna Ceannsalach who lived in the fourth century. It is said that the sept of O'Dunlaing (which is the Irish form of the name) held territory in Feara Tulagh now the barony of Fertullagh, in the county Westmeath, long before the Norman invasion of the late 12th century. From here they were driven south by the ruling family of O'Melaghlins (whence came several High Kings). Resettling in Ely O'Carroll Country, they became one of the Seven Septs of Leix along with Devoy, Doran, McEvoy, O'Kelly, Lawlor and O'More (Moore).

The historian O'Heerin has the O'Dowlings as chiefs of Siol Elaigh (now the barony of Shillelagh in County Wicklow) and the Lagan and speaks of them as follows &ldots;

The race of Ealaigh, the tribe of steeds,
To protect which is proper for O'Gahan,
Chief of the clan, powerful in friendship,
O'Dunlaing was the warrior of the Lagan.

The leading land-owning members of the sept in Leix (or Laois) were further transplanted to Tarbert on the border of north Kerry and west Limerick in 1608-9 as part of the Plantation of Laois and Offaly, under which the two counties were renamed as Queen's and King's County respectively.

This transplantation did not affect the rank and file of the sept who multiplied in their original territory: this lay along the western bank of the River Barrow, anciently called Fearann ua n-Dunlaing i.e. O'Dowling's country. Thence they spread eastwards through Counties Carlow and Kilkenny (where they are most numerous today) and even as far as Co. Wicklow - there are no less than four townlands called Ballydowling in the Rathdrum area of Co. Wicklow. Many of the name settled in Dublin City relatively early in time. Hence, we find Dowling more numerous in Dublin in 1890, than in either Kilkenny or Queens County (Leix). The transplantation to Kerry had little permanent effect as regards numbers; nevertheless, two or three of the many Dowlings of distinction, nearly all of whom were connected with literary activities in some form, were Kerrymen: viz. Bartholomew Dowling (1823-1863) was author of the Brigade of Fontenoy. He edited the San Francisco Monitor in 1858 and died in that city, he was born in Listowel then taken to Canada, returned to Limerick and then went to farming in California. His brother William settled in San Francisco, and wrote poems for the papers there.

Most Rev. Austin Dowling (1868-1930), Archbishop of St. Paul's, U.S.A., was of a family, which emigrated from Co. Kerry or Co. Limerick.

Batt Dowling, 1844-1912 was born in Kerry, went to Fort Wayne and moved to New Haven, Indiana, where he was a hardware merchant, he served from 1861, in 20th Ohio Vol. Regt, through the civil war.

All the others were natives of Leix or one of the adjoining counties.

Thady Dowling was an ecclesiastic and annalist. Of his life little is known beyond the circumstance of his having been, in about 1590, ecclesiastic treasurer of the See of Leighlin in the County of Carlow. In 1591 Dowling was advanced to the chancellorship of that See. He is mentioned in the record of regal visitation in 1615 as an ancient Irish minister aged seventy-one, qualified to teach Latin and Irish. Dowling is said to have died at Leighlin in 1628, in his eighty-fourth year. A grammar of the Irish language and other writings ascribed to him by Ware are not now known to be extant. His "Annals of Ireland", in Latin, were mainly compiled from printed books, with the addition occasionally of brief notes on local matters. The Annals extend from the fabulous period to 1600, and most entries are very succinct. No autographed manuscript of Dowling's "Annales Hiberniæ" is at present accessible. They were edited in 1849 for the Irish Archaeological Society by the Very Rev. Richard Butler, dean of Clanmacnoise, from a transcript in the Library of Trinity College, Dublin. The editor was unable to throw light upon Dowling's career, nor does he appear to have been fully conversant with the sources from which Dowling derived the materials for his compilation. Copies of documents of 1541 in the writing and attested by Dowling as Chancellor of Leighlin are extant among the state papers, Ireland, in the Public Records Office, London. A transcript of an official document, with an attestation by Dowling in April 1555, is preserved in the same repository.

Among the other famous members of the Laois family were Vincent Dowling (1787-1844), colonial judge and author of legal treatises, and Vincent George Dowling (1785- 1852), founder, and editor for nearly thirty years, of Bell's Life and also of Fistiana, publications which were carried on in turn by his son Frank Lewis Dowling (1821-1867). Richard Dowling (1846-1898), novelist and editor of the Dublin humorous journals Zozimus and Ireland's Eye, was also a Leix man, as was Dr. Jeremiah Dowling (1830-1906), author of The Claddagh Boatman.

In the twentieth century, one Dowling of note was Bridget (1891-1969), daughter of William Dowling of Dublin. She eloped with and married, in 1910, Alois (1882 - 1956) , half brother of Adolf Hitler. The couple lived in Liverpool and had a son, William Patrick Hitler (1911 - 1987). After she and her son settled in the U.S.A., Bridget wrote "My Brother-in-Law Adolf". The book remained unfinished and unpublished, though the manuscript now resides in the New York Public Library. William Patrick spent most of the 1930's in Germany but was disappointed his uncle's refusal to use his influence to further his career. He returned to England for a while then moved back to the U.S.A. where he lectured on the subject of his uncle for some years. He served in the US Navy during the World War II and was honourably discharged at the end of hostilities. He worked for a while in an American hospital and then changed his name and went into total obscurity. He was confirmed as being still alive in 1977 and his year of death is said to be 1987. He is recorded as having married (Phyllis) and to have had three sons, Brian, Alex and Louis, who are presumably the righful heirs of Adolf Hitler.

Mick Dowling, amateur boxer at bantamweight was born in Castlecorner, Co. Kilkenny. He has the unique record in Irish amateur boxing of winning the Irish National Seniors Championship title at the same weight for 8 successive years, in 1968 to 1975, all at bantamweight, in 1972 he reached the last eight in the Olympic bantamweight event in Munich, thereby being placed joint fifth in that weight division; he had previously represented Ireland at the Mexico Olympic games in 1968 , in a distinguished career during which he became the great Irish boxing hope, he was selected as Texaco's Boxing Sportstar of the year for 3 years in succession, in 1968, 1969 and 1970, the only amateur boxer to win such an acclaim. He is a sportshop owner and has been a prominent figure in Irish amateur boxing since his retirement.

In 1659 the name Dowling was a principal Irish name in the Kilkenny baronies of Crannagh, Gowran and Fassadinin, as well as the city and liberties of Kilkenny. The name Dowly & Dooly was a principal name in the baronies of Galmoy and Gowran. Outside of Dublin Dowling still had strong Laois and Kilkenny ties in the mid-19th century Valuation. In Wicklow the name is sparse in that record. The 1890 census for Kilkenny noted 14 births in that year for the surname Dowling.

Heraldry
Arms: Argent a holly tree eradicated proper, on a chief Azure a lion passant between two trefoils slipt Or.
Crest: A lion's head erased Azure collared gemelles Or.
Motto: fortis et egregious [Brave and distinguished].

This coat of arms was officially granted in 1662, but is probably much older than that.

 
Ancient genealogy of O'Dowling according to O'Hart's Irish Pedigrees.

"Irish Pedigrees or the Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation", by John O'Hart is one of the best known Irish genealogical publications in the world. The first edition appeared in 1876, but was followed by several subsequent editions that added greatly to the overall size of the work. The most quoted edition was published in New York in 1923, twenty years after the author's death.
John O'Hart was born in Crossmolina, Co. Mayo, in 1824. He received an excellent education with the intention of joining the priesthood. However, he instead spent two years in the constabulary (the police), after which he was employed by the Commissioners of National Education in Ireland from 1845, the first year of the Famine. He became an Associate in Arts at the Queen's University, and thereafter he was an active member of several scholarly societies. He was an avid genealogist and took a keen interest in Irish history, despite never receiving formal training as an historian. Politically he was an Irish nationalist, and in religious matters, a committed Catholic. Both of these factors permeated his work. He died in 1902 in Clontarf, Co. Dublin, at the age of 78.
O'Hart used many sources to compile the information that appears in his major work. His principal sources were Gaelic genealogies, like those of O'Clery, MacFirbis and O'Farrell. Along with the Gaelic annals, especially the Annals of the Four Masters, O'Hart was able to 'reconstruct' the medieval and ancient pedigree that appears here. He also used later sources, like the works of Burke, Collins, Harris, Lodge and Ware to extend these lineages into the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. But arguably the most important information contained in these genealogies came where O'Hart gathered the details directly from the families concerned, often from private papers or family tradition.
Irish mythology records that every family was descended from a certain Milesius of Spain who in about 500 BC led his followers to invade and conquer Ireland. The Christian monks who wrote these genealogies down in the 9th century, 2,500 years after Milesius, also added their own beliefs. So they recorded that Milesius was the 36th in descent from Adam! O'Hart, being both an ardent believer in the Gaelic myths and Christianity, followed their example. In his Gaelic genealogies a number representing the generation of descent from Adam precedes every generation. O'Hart showed, probably incorrectly, that every Gaelic family was descended from four of Milesius's family. These were his three sons, Heber, Ir and Heremon, and his uncle Ithe. These four were considered the 'stem' lines of the genealogies that followed. The latest scientiific evidence suggests that while the Celts had an overwhelming cultural influence on Ireland, the numbers of them that invaded Ireland were not all that huge and from the genetic point of view they are just a part of the mix that made up the Irish population.
While he undertook a great deal of research, using the majority of available published sources, many Gaelic scholars have superseded his work over the last 100 years. He was not familiar with the abundant unpublished Gaelic manuscript sources available. These have shown that many of his genealogies are incorrect for the years prior to 1600 AD. Furthermore, O'Hart was not a professional historian or genealogist, and had little training in using the esoteric sources he consulted. As a consequence he misunderstood a great deal about Gaelic society and culture, a world which had largely disappeared from Ireland long before he put pen to paper. He was also credulous in using the sources he did consult, believing that the myths were fact.
In short, while the pedigree below is interesting, it should be read with a sceptical eye, and the further back you go, the more sceptical your eye should become.
1. Adam
2. Seth
3. Enos
4. Cainan
5. Mahalaleel
6. Jared
7. Enoch
8. Methuselah
9. Lamech
10. Noah divided the world amongst his three sons, begotten of his wife Titea: viz., to Shem he gave Asia, within the Euphrates, to the Indian Ocean; to Ham he gave Syria, Arabia, and Africa; and to Japhet, the rest of Asia beyond the Euphrates, together with Europe to Gadea (or Cadiz).
11. Japhet was the eldest son of Noah. He had fifteen sons, amongst whom he divided Europe and the part of Asia which his father had allotted to him.
12. Magog: From whom descended the Parthians, Bactrians, Amazons, etc.; Parthalon, the first planter of Ireland, about three hundred years after the Flood; and also the rest of the colonies that planted there, viz., the Nemedians, who planted Ireland, Anno Mundi three thousand and forty-six, or three hundred and eighteen years after the birth of Abraham, and two thousand one hundred and fifty-three years before Christ. The Nemedians continued in Ireland for two hundred and seventeen years; within which time a colony of theirs went into the northern parts of Scotland, under the conduct of their leader Briottan Maol, from whom Britain takes its name, and not from "Brutus," as some persons believed. From Magog were also descended the Belgarian, Belgian, Firbolgian or Firvolgian colony that succeeded the Nemedians, Anno Mundi, three thousand two hundred and sixty-six, and who first erected Ireland into a Monarchy. [According to some writers, the Fomorians invaded Ireland next after the Nemedians.] This Belgarian of Firvolgian colony continued in Ireland for thirty-six years, under nine of their Kings; when they were supplanted by the Tuatha-de-Danann (which means, according to some authorities, "the people of the god Dan," whom they adored), who possessed Ireland for one hundred and ninety-seven years, during the reigns of nine of their kings; and who were then conquered by the Gaelic, Milesian, or Scotic Nation (the three names by which the Irish people were known), Anno Mundi three thousand five hundred. This Milesian or Scotic Irish Nation possessed and enjoyed the Kingdom of Ireland for two thousand eight hundred and eighty-five years, under one hundred and eighty-three Monarchs; until their submission to King Henry the Second of England, Anno Domini one thousand one hundred and eighty-six.
13. Boath, one of the sons of Magog; to whom Scythia came as his lot, upon the division of the Earth by Noah amongst his sons, and by Japhet of his part thereof amongst his sons.
14. Phœniusa Farsaidh (or Fenius Farsa) was King of Scythia, at the time when Ninus ruled the Assyrian Empire; and, being a wise man and desirous to learn the languages that not long before confounded the builders of the Tower of Babel, employed able and learned men to go among the dispersed multitude to learn their several languages; who sometime after returning well skilled in what they went for, Phœniusa Farsaidh erected a school in the valley of Senaar, near the city of Æothena, in the forty-second year of the reign of Ninus; whereupon, having continued there with his younger son Niul for twenty years, he returned home to his kingdom, which, at his death, he left to the oldest son Nenuall; leaving to Niul no other patrimony than his learning and the benefit of the said school.
15. Niul, after his father returned to Scythia, continued some time at œothena, teaching the languages and other laudable sciences, until upon report of his great learning he was invited into Egypt by Pharaoh, the King; who gave him the land of Campus Cyrunt, near the Red Sea to inhabit, and his daughter Scota in marriage; from whom their posterity are ever since called Scots; but, according to some annalists, the name "Scots" is derived from the word Scythia. It was this Niul that employed Gaodhal [Gael], son of Ethor, a learned and skilful man, to compose or rather refine and adorn the language, called Bearla Tobbai, which was common to all Niul's posterity, and afterwards called Gaodhilg (or Gaelic), from the said Gaodhal who composed or refined it; and for his sake also Niul called his own eldest son "Gaodhal."
16. Gaodhal (or Gathelus), the son of Niul, and ancestor of Clan-na-Gael, that is, "the children or descendants of Gaodhal". In his youth this Gaodhal was stung in the neck by a serpent, and was immediately brought to Moses, who, laying his rod upon the wounded place, instantly cured him; whence followed the word "Glas" to be added to his named, as Gaodhal Glas (glas: Irish, green; Lat. glaucus; Gr. glaukos), on account of the green scar which the word signifies, and which, during his life, remained on his neck after the wound was healed. And Gaodhal obtained a further blessing, namely-that no venomous beast can live any time where his posterity should inhabit; which is verified in Creta or Candia, Gothia or Getulia, Ireland, etc. The Irish chroniclers affirm that from this time Gaodhal and his posterity did paint the figures of Beasts, Birds, etc., on their banners and shields, to distinguish their tribes and septs, in imitation of the Israelites; and that a "Thunderbolt" was the cognisance in their chief standard for many generations after this Gaodhal.
17. Asruth, after his father's death, continued in Egypt and governed his colony in peace during his life.
18. Sruth, soon after his father's death, was set upon by the Egyptians, on account of their former animosities towards their predecessors for having taken part with the Israelites against them; which animosities until then lay raked up in the embers, and now broke out in a flame to that degree, that after many battles and conflicts wherein most of his colony lost their live, Sruth was forced with the few remaining to depart the country; and, after many traverses at sea, arrived at the Island of Creta (now called Candia), where he paid his last tribute to nature.
19. Heber Scut (scut: Irish, a Scot), after his father's death and a year's stay in Creta, departed thence, leaving some of his people to inhabit the Island, where some of their posterity likely still remain; "because the Island breeds no venomous serpent ever since." He and his people soon after arrived in Scythia; where his cousins, the posterity of Nenuall (eldest son of Fenius Farsa, above mentioned), refusing to allot a place of habitation form him and his colony, they fought many battles wherein Heber (with the assistance of some of the natives who were ill-affected towards their king), being always victor, he at length forced the sovereignty from the other, and settled himself and his colony in Scythia, who continued there for four generations. (Hence the epithet Scut, "a Scot" or "a Scythian," was applied to this Heber, who was accordingly called Heber Scot.) Heber Scot was afterwards slain in battle by Noemus the former king's son.
20. Baouman;
21 Ogaman; and
22. Tait, were each kings of Scythia, but in constant war with the natives; so that after Tait's death his son,
23. Agnon and his followers betook themselves to sea, wandering and coasting upon the Caspian Sean for several (some say seven) years in which time he died.
24. Lamhfionn and his fleet remained at sea for some time, after his father's death, resting and refreshing themselves upon such islands as they met with. It was then the Cachear, their magician or Druid, foretold that there would be no end of their peregrinations and travel until they should arrive at the Western Island of Europe, now called Ireland, which was the place destined for their future and lasting abode and settlement; and that not they but their posterity after three hundred years should arrive there. After many traverses of fortune at sea, this little fleet with their leader arrived at last and landed at Gothia or Geulia-more recently called Lybia, where Carthage was afterwards built; and, soon after, Lamhfionn died there.
25. Heber Glunfionn was born in Gothia, where he died. His posterity continued there to the eighth generation; and were kings or chief rulers there for one hundred and fifty years-some say three hundred years.
26 Agnan Fionn;
27. Febric Glas;
28. Nenuall;
29. Nuadhad;
30. Alladh;
31. Arcadh; and
32. Deag: of these nothing remarkable is mentioned, but that they lived and died kings in Gothia or Getulia.
33. Brath was born in Gothia. Remembering the Druid's prediction, and his people having considerably multiplied during their abode in Geulia, he departed thence with a numerous fleet to seek out the country destined for their final settlement, by the prophecy of Cachear, the Druid above mentioned; and, after some time, he landed upon the coast of Spain, and by strong hand settled himself and his colony in Galicia, in the north of that country.
34. Breoghan (or Brigus) was king of Galicia, Andalusia, Murcia, Castile, and Portugal-all of which he conquered. He built Breoghan's Tower or Brigantia in Galicia, and the city of Brigantia or Braganza in Portugal-called after him; and the kingdom of Castile was then also called after him Brigia. It is considered that "Castile" itself was so called from the figure of a castle which Brigus bore for his Arms on his banner. Brigus sent a colony into Britain, who settled in that territory now known as the counties of York, Lancaster, Durham, Westmoreland, and Cumberland, and, after him were called Brigantes; whose posterity gave formidable opposition to the Romans, at the time of the Roman invasion of Britain.
35. Bilé; was king of those countries after his father's death; and his son Galamh [galav] or Milesius succeeded him. This Bilé had a brother named Ithe.
36. Milesius, in his youth and in his father's life-time, went into Scythia, where he was kindly received by the king of that country, who gave him his daughter in marriage, and appointed him General of his forces. In this capacity Milesius defeated the king's enemies, gained much fame, and the love of all the king's subjects. His growing greatness and popularity excited against him the jealousy of the king; who, fearing the worst, resolved on privately dispatching Milesius our of the way, for, openly, he dare not attempt it. Admonished of the king's intentions in his regard, Milesius slew him; and thereupon quitted Scythia and retired into Egypt with a fleet of sixty sail. Pharaoh Nectonibus, then king of Egypt, being informed of his arrival and of his great valour, wisdom, and conduct in arms, made him General of all his forces against the king of Ethiopia then invading his country. Here, as in Scythia, Milesius was victorious; he forced the enemy to submit to the conqueror's own terms of peace. By these exploits Milesius found great favour with Pharaoh, who gave him, being then a widower, his daughter Scota in marriage; and kept him eight years afterwards in Egypt. During the sojourn of Milesius in Egypt, he employed the most ingenious and able persons among his people to be instructed in the several trades, arts, and sciences used in Egypt; in order to have them taught to the rest of his people on his return to Spain. [The original name of Milesius of Spain was "Galamh" (gall: Irish, a stranger; amh, a negative affix), which means, no stranger: meaning that he was no stranger in Egypt, where he was called "Milethea Spaine," which was afterwards contracted to "Miló Spaine" (meaning the Spanish Hero), and finally to "Milesiius" (mileadh: Irish, a hero; Lat. miles, a soldier).] At length Milesius took leave of his father-in-law, and steered towards Spain; where he arrived to the great joy and comfort of his people; who were much harassed by the rebellion of the natives and by the intrusion of other foreign nations that forced in after his father's death, and during his own long absence from Spain. With these and those he often met; and, in fifty-four battles, victoriously fought, he routed, destroyed, and totally extirpated them out of the country, which he settled in peace and quietness. In his reign a great dearth and famine occurred in Spain, of twenty-six years' continuance, occasioned, as well by reason of the former troubles which hindered the people from cultivating, and manuring the ground, as for want of rain to moisten the earth - but Milesius superstitiously believed the famine to have fallen upon him and his people as a judgment and punishment from their gods, for their negligence in seeking out the country destined for their final abode, so long before foretold by Cachear their Druid or magician, as already mentioned - the time limited by the prophecy for the accomplishment thereof being now nearly, if not fully, expired. To expiate his fault and to comply with the will of his gods, Milesius, with the general approbation of his people, sent his uncle Ithe, with his son Lughaidh [Luy], and one hundred and fifty stout men to bring them an account of those western islands; who, accordingly, arriving at the island since then called Ireland, and landing in that part of it now called Munster, left his son with fifty of his men to guard the ship, and with the rest travelled about the island. Informed, among other things, that the three sons of Cearmad, called Mac-Cuill, MacCeacht, and MacGreine, did then and for thirty years before rule and govern the island, each for one year, in his turn; and that the country was called after the names of their three queens - Eire, Fodhla, and Banbha, respectively: one year called "Eire," the next "Fodhla," and the next "Banbha," as their husbands reigned in their regular turns; by which names the island is ever since indifferently called, but most commonly "Eire," because that MacCuill, the husband of Eire, ruled and governed the country in his turn the year that the Clan-na-Milé (or the sons of Milesius) arrived in and conquered Ireland. And being further informed that the three brothers were then at their palace at Aileach Neid, in the north part of the country, engaged in the settlement of some disputes concerning their family jewels, Ithe directed his course thither; sending orders to his son to sail about with his ship and the rest of his men, and meet him there. When Ithe arrived where the (Danann) brothers were, be was honourably received and entertained by them; and, finding him to be a mail of great wisdom. and knowledge, they referred their disputes to him for decision. That decision having met their entire satisfaction, Ithe exhorted them to mutual love, peace, and forbearance; adding much in praise of their delightful, pleasant, and fruitful country; and then took his leave, to return to his ship, and go back to Spain. No sooner was he gone than the brothers; began to reflect on the high commendations which Ithe gave of the Island; and, suspecting his design of bringing others to invade it, resolved to prevent them, and therefore pursued him with a strong party, overtook him, fought and routed his men and wounded himself to death (before his son or the rest of his men left on ship-board could come to his rescue) at a place called, from that fight and his name, Magh Ithe or "The plain of Ithe" (an extensive plain in the barony of Raphoe, county Donegal); whence his son, having found him in that condition, brought his dead and mangled body back into Spain, and there exposed it to public view, thereby to excite his friends and relations to avenge his murder. [Note: that all the invaders and planters of Ireland, namely, Parthalonians, Neimhedh, the Firbolgs, Tuatha-de-Danann, and Clan-na-Milé, where originally Scythians, of the line of Japbet, who had the language called Bearla-Tobbai or Gaoidhilg [Gaelic] common amongst them all; and consequently not to be wondered at, that Ithe and the Tuatha-de-Danann understood one another without an Interpreter - both speaking the same language, though perhaps with some difference in the accent]. The exposing of the dead body of Ithe had the desired effect; for, thereupon, Milesius made great preparations in order to invade Ireland - as well to avenge his uncle's death, as also in obedience to the will of his gods, signified by the prophecy of Cachear, aforesaid. But, before he could effect that object, he died, leaving the care, and charge of that expedition upon his eight legitimate sons by his two wives before mentioned. Milesius was a very valiant champion, a great warrior, and fortunate and prosperous in all his undertakings: witness his name of "Milesius," given him from the many battles (some say a thousand, which the word "Milé" signifies in Irish as well as in Latin) which he victoriously fought and won, as well in Spain, as in all the other countries and kingdoms be traversed in his younger days. The eight brothers were neither forgetful nor negligent in the execution of their father's command; but, soon after his death, with a numerous fleet well manned and equipped, set forth from Breoghan's Tower or Brigantia (now Corunna) in Galicia, in Spain, and sailed prosperously to the coasts of Ireland or lnis-Fail, where they met many difficulties and various chances before they could land: occasioned by the diabolical arts, sorceries, and enchantments used by the Tuatha-de-Danann, to obstruct their landing; for, by their magic art, they enchanted the island so as to appear to the Milesians or Clan-na-Milé in the form of a Hog, and no way to come at it (whence the island, among the many other names it had before, was called "Muc-Inis or "The Hog Island"); and withal raised so great a storm, that the Milesian fleet was thereby totally dispersed and many of them cast away, wherein five of the eight brothers, sons of Milesius, lost their lives. That part of the fleet commanded by Heber, Heremon, and Amergin (the three surviving, brothers), and Heber Donn, son of Ir (one of the brothers lost in the storm), overcame all opposition, landed safe, fought and routed the three Tuatha-de Danann Kings at Slieve-Mis, and thence pursued and overtook them at Tailten, where another bloody battle was fought; wherein the three (Tuatha-de-Danann) Kings and their Queens were slain, and their army utterly routed and destroyed: so that they could never after give any opposition to the Clan-na-Milé in their new conquest; who, having thus sufficiently avenged the death of their great uncle Ithe, gained the possession of the country foretold them by Cachear, some ages past, as already mentioned. Heber and Heremon, the chief leading men remaining of the eight brothers, sons of Milesius aforesaid, divided the kingdom between them (allotting a proportion of land to their brother Amergin, who was their Arch-priest, Druid, or magician; and to their nephew Heber Donn, and to the rest of their chief commanders), and became jointly the first of one hundred and eighty-three Kings or sole Monarchs of the Gaelic, Milesian, or Scottish Race, that ruled and governed Ireland, successively, for two thousand eight hundred and eighty-five years from the first year of their reign), Anno Mundi three thousand five hundred, to their submission to the Crown of England in the person of King Henry the Second; who, being also of the Milesian Race by Maude, his mother, was lineally descended from Fergus Mór MacEarca, first King of Scotland, who was descended from the said Heremon - so that the succession may be truly said to continue in the Milesian Blood from before Christ one thousand six hundred and ninety-nine years down to the present time. Heber and Heremon reigned jointly one year only, when, upon a difference between their ambitious wives, they quarrelled and fought a battle at Ardeath or Geshill (Geashill, near Tullamore in the King's County), where Heber was slain by Heremon; and, soon after, Amergin, who claimed an equal share in the government, was, in another battle fought between them, likewise slain by Heremon. Thus, Heremon became sole Monarch, and made a new division of the land amongst his comrades and friends, viz.: the south part, now called Munster, he gave to his brother Heber's four sons, Er, Orba, Feron, and Fergna; the north part, now Ulster, he gave to Ir's only son Heber Donn; the east part or Coigeadh, Galian, now called Leinster, be gave to Criomthann-sciath-bheil, one of his commanders; and the west part, now called Connaught, Heremon gave to Un-Mac-Oigge, another of his commanders; allotting a part of Munster to Lughaidh (the son of Ithe, the first Milesian discoverer of Ireland), amongst his brother Heber's sons. From these three brothers, Heber, Ir, and Heremon (Amergin dying without issue), are descended all the Milesian Irish of Ireland and Scotland, viz.: from Heber, the eldest brother, the provincial Kings of Munster (of whom thirty-eight were sole Monarchs of Ireland), and most of the nobility and gentry of Munster, and many noble families in Scotland, are descended. From Ir, the second brother, all the provincial Kings of Ulster (of whom twenty-six were sole Monarchs of Ireland), and all the ancient nobility and gentry of Ulster, and many noble families in Leinster, Munster, and Connaught, derive their pedigrees; and, in Scotland, the Clan-na-Rory - the descendants of an eminent man, named Ruadhri or Roderick, who was Monarch of Ireland for seventy years (viz., from Before Christ 288 to 218). From Heremon, the youngest of the three brothers, were descended one hundred and fourteen sole Monarchs of Ireland: the provincial Kings and Hermonian nobility and gentry of Leinster, Connaught, Meath, Orgiall, Tirowen, Tirconnell, and Clan-na-boy; the Kings of Dalriada; all the Kings of Scotland from Fergus Mór MacEarea, down to the Stuarts; and the Kings and Queens of England from Henry the Second down to tile present time. The issue of Ithe is not accounted among the Milesian Irish or Clan-na-Milé, as not being descended from Milesius, but from his uncle Ithe; of whose posterity there were also some Monarchs of Ireland (see Roll of the Irish Monarchs, infra), and many provincial or half provincial Kings of Munster: that country upon its first division being allocated to the sons of Heber and to Lughaidh, son of Ithe, whose posterity continued there accordingly. This invasion, conquest, or plantation of Ireland by the Milesian or Scottish Nation took place in the Year of the World three thousand Ova hundred, or the next year after Solomon began the foundation of the Temple of Jerusalem, and one thousand six hundred and ninety-nine years before the Nativity of our Saviour Jesus Christ; which, according to the Irish computation of Time, occurred Anno Mundi five thousand one hundred and ninety-nine: therein agreeing with the Septuagint, Roman Martyrologies, Eusebius, Orosius, and other ancient authors; which computation the ancient Irish chroniclers exactly observed in their Books of the Reigns of the Monarchs of Ireland, and other Antiquities of that Kingdom ; out of which the Roll of the Monarchs of Ireland, from the beginning of the Milesian Monarchy to their submission to King Henry the Second of England, a Prince of their own Blood, is exactly collected. [As the Milesian invasion of Ireland took place the next year after the laying of the foundation of the Temple of Jerusalem by Solomon, King of Israel, we may infer that Solomon was contemporary with Milesius of Spain; and that the Pharaoh King of Egypt, who (1 Kings iii. 1,) gave his daughter in marriage to Solomon, was the Pharaoh who conferred on Milesius of Spain the hand of another daughter Scota.] Milesius of Spain bore three Lions in his shield and standard, for the following reasons; namely, that, in his travels in his younger days into foreign countries, passing through Africa, he, by his cunning and valour, killed in one morning three Lions; and that, in memory of so noble and valiant an exploit, he always after bore three Lions on his shield, which his two surviving sons Heber and Heremon, and his grandson Heber Donn, son of Ir, after their conquest of Ireland, divided amongst them, as well as they did the country: each of them. bearing a Lion in his shield and banner, but of different colours; which the Chiefs of their posterity continue to this day: some with additions and differences; others plain and entire as they had it from their ancestors.
37. Heremon was the seventh son of Milesius of Spain (who is No. 36, p. 50), but the third of the three sons who left any issue. From him were descended the Kings, Nobility, and Gentry of the Kingdoms of Connaught, Dalriada, Leinster, Meath, Orgiall, Ossory; of Scotland, since the fifth century; of Ulster, since the fourth century; and of England, from the reign of King Henry II., down to the present time.
"The House of Heremon," writes O'Callaghan, "from the number of its princes, or great families - from the multitude of its distinguished characters, as laymen or churchmen - and from the extensive territories acquired by those belonging to it, at home and abroad, or in Alba as well as in Ireland - was regarded as by far the most illustrious: so much so, according to the best native authority, that it would be as reasonable to affirm that one pound is equal in value to one hundred pounds, as it would be to compare any other line with that of Heremon."
He and his eldest brother Heber were, jointly, the first Milesian Monarchs of Ireland; they began to reign, A.M. 3,500, or, Before Christ, 1699. After Heber was slain, B.C. 1698, Heremon reigned singly for fourteen years; during which time a certain colony called by the Irish Cruithneaigh, in English "Cruthneans" or Picts, arrived in Ireland and requested Heremon to assign them a part of the country to settle in, which he refused; but, giving them as wives the widows of the Tuatha-de-Danans, slain in battle, he sent them with a strong party of his own forces to conquer the country then called "Alba," but now Scotland; conditionally, that they and their posterity should be tributary to the Monarchs of Ireland. Heremon died, B.C. 1683, and was succeeded by three of his four sons, named Muimne, Luigne, and Laighean, who reigned jointly for three years, and were slain by their Heberian successors.
38. Irial Faidh ("faidh": Irish, a prophet): his son; was the 10th Monarch of Ireland; d. B.C. 1670. This was a very learned King; could foretell things to come; and caused much of the country to be cleared of the ancient forests. He likewise built seven royal palaces, viz., Rath Ciombaoith, Rath Coincheada, Rath Mothuig, Rath Buirioch, Rath Luachat, Rath Croicne, and Rath Boachoill. He won four remarkable battles over his enemies: - Ard Inmath, at Teabtha, where Stirne, the son of Dubh, son of Fomhar, was slain; the second battle was at Teanmhuighe, against the Fomhoraice, where Eichtghe, their leader, was slain; the third was the battle of Loch Muighe, where Lugrot, the son of Moghfeibhis, was slain; and the fourth was the battle of Cuill Martho, where the four sons of Heber were defeated. Irial died in the second year after this battle, having reigned 10 years, and was buried at Magh Muagh.
39. Eithrial: his son; was the 11th Monarch; reigned 20 years; and was slain by Conmaol, the son of Heber Fionn, at the battle of Soirrean, in Leinster, B.C. 1650.
This also was a learned King, he wrote with his own hand the History of the Gaels (or Gadelians); in his reign seven large woods were cleared and much advance made in the practice of agriculture.
40. Foll-Aich: his son; was kept out of the Monarchy by Conmaol, the slayer of his father, who usurped his place.
41. Tigernmas : his son; was the 13th Monarch, and reigned 77 years; according to Keating, he reigned but 50 years; he fought twenty-seven battles with the followers of the family of Heber Fionn, all which he gained. In his reign gold was mined near the Liffey, and skilfully worked by Inchadhan. This King also made a law that each grade of society should be known by the number of colours in its wearing apparel: - the clothes of a slave should be of one colour; those of a soldier of two; the dress of a commanding officer to be of three colours; a gentleman's dress, who kept a table for the free entertainment of strangers, to be of four colours; five colours to be allowed to the nobility (the chiefs); and the King, Queen, and Royal Family, as well as the Druids, historians, and other learned men to wear six colours.
This King died, B.C. 1543, on the Eve of 1st of November, with two-thirds of the people of Ireland, at Magh Sleaght (or Field of Adoration), in the county of Leitrim, as he was adoring the Sun-God, Crom Cruach (a quo Macroom).
Historians say this Monarch was the first who introduced image worship in Ireland.
42. Enboath: his son. It was in this prince's lifetime that the Kingdom was divided in two parts by a line drawn from Drogheda to Limerick.
43. Smiomghall: his son; in his lifetime the Picts in Scotland were forced to abide by their oath, and pay homage to the Irish Monarch; seven large woods were also cut down.
44. Fiacha Labhrainn: his son; was the 18th Monarch; reigned 24 years; slew Eochaidh Faobharglas, of the line of Heber, at the battle of Carman. During his reign all the inhabitants of Scotland were brought in subjection to the Irish Monarchy, and the conquest was secured by his son the 20th Monarch. Fiacha at length (B.C. 1448) fell in the battle of Bealgadain, by the hands of Eochaidh Mumho, the son of Moefeibhis, of the race of Heber Fionn.
45. Aongus Olmucach: his son; was the 20th Monarch; in his reign the Picts again refused to pay the tribute imposed on them 250 years before, by Heremon, but this Monarch went with a strong army into Alba and in thirty pitched battles overcame them and forced them to pay the required tribute.
Aongus was at length slain by Eana, in the battle of Carman, B.C. 1409.
46. Main: his son; was kept out of the Monarchy by Eadna, of the line of Heber Fionn. In his time silver shields were given as rewards for bravery to the Irish militia.
47. Rotheachtach : his son; was the 22nd Monarch; slain, B.C. 1357, by Sedne (or Seadhna), of the Line of Ir.
48. Dein: his son; was kept out of the Monarchy by his father's slayer, and his son. In his time gentlemen and noblemen first wore gold chains round their necks, as a sign of their birth; and golden helmets were given to brave soldiers,
49. Siorna "Saoghalach" (long-oevus): his son; was the 34th Monarch; he obtained the name "Saoghalach" on account of his extraordinary long life; slain, B.C 1030, at Aillin, by Rotheachta, of the line of Heber Fionn, who usurped the Monarchy, thereby excluding from the throne -
50. Olioll Aolcheoin: son of Siorna Saoghalach.
51. Gialchadh: his son; was the 37th Monarch; killed by Art Imleach, of the Line of Heber Fionn, at Moighe Muadh, B.C. 1013.
52. Nuadhas Fionnfail: his son; was the 39th Monarch; slain by Breasrioghacta, his successor, B.C. 961.
53. Aedan Glas: his son. In his time the coast was infested with pirates; and there occurred a dreadful plague (Apthach) which swept away most of the inhabitants.
54. Simeon Breac: his son; was the 44th Monarch; he inhumanly caused his predecessor to be torn asunder; but, after a reign of six years, he met with a like death, by order of Duach Fionn, son to the murdered King, B.C. 903.
55. Muredach Bolgach: his son; was the 46th Monarch; killed by Eadhna Dearg, B.C. 892; he had two sons - Duach Teamhrach, and Fiacha.
56. Fiacha Tolgrach: son of Muredach; was the 55th Monarch. His brother Duach had two sons, Eochaidh Framhuine and Conang Beag-eaglach, who were the 51st and 53rd Monarchs of Ireland.
Fiacha's life was ended by the sword of Oilioll Fionn, of the Line of Heber Fionn, B.C. 795.
57. Duach Ladhrach: his son; was the 59th Monarch; killed by Lughaidh Laighe, son of Oilioll Fionn, B.C. 737.
58. Eochaidh Buadhach: his son; was kept out of the Monarchy by his father's slayer. In his time the kingdom was twice visited with a plague.
59. Ugaine Mór : his son. This Ugaine (or Hugony) the Great was the 66th Monarch of Ireland. Was called Mór on account of his extensive dominions, - being sovereign of all the Islands of Western Europe. Was married to Cæsair, dau. to the King of France, and by her had issue - twenty-two sons and three daughters. In order to prevent these children encroaching on each other he divided the Kingdom into twenty-five portions, allotting to each his (or her) distinct inheritance. By means of this division the taxes of the country were collected during the succeeding 300 years. All the sons died without issue except two, viz: - Laeghaire Lorc, ancestor of all the Leinster Heremonians; and Cobthach Caolbhreagh, from whom the Heremonians of Leath Cuinn, viz., Meath, Ulster, and Conacht derive their pedigree.
Ugaine was at length, B.C. 593, slain by Badhbhchadh, who failed to secure the fruits of his murder - the Irish Throne, as he was executed by order of Laeghaire Lorc, the murdered Monarch's son, who became the 68th Monarch.
60. Laeghaire Lorc, the 68th Monarch of Ireland: son of Ugaine Mór; began to reign, B.C. 593.
61. Olioll Aine: his son.
62. Labhradh Longseach: his son.
63. Olioll Bracan: his son.
64. Aonghus Ollamh: his son; the 73rd Monarch.
65. Breassal: his son.
66. Fergus Fortamhail, the 80th Monarch: his son; slain B.C. 384.
67. Felim Fortuin: his son.
68. Crimthann Coscrach: his son; the 85th Monarch.
69. Mogh-Art: his son.
70. Art: his son.
71. Allod (by some called Olioll): his son.
72. Nuadh Falaid: his son.
73. Fearach Foghlas: his son.
74. Olioll Glas: his son.
75. Fiacha Fobrug: his son.
76. Breassal Breac: his son. Had two sons - 1. Lughaidh, 2. Conla, between whom he divided his country, viz. - to his eldest son Lughaidh [Luy], who was ancestor of the Kings, nobility, and gentry of Leinster, he gave all the territories on the north side of the river Bearbha (now the "Barrow"), from Wicklow to Drogheda; and to his son Conla, who was ancestor of the Kings, nobility, and gentry of Ossory, he gave the south part, from the said river to the sea.
77. Luy: son of Breassal Breac.
78. Sedna: his son; built the royal city of Rath Alinne.
79. Nuadhas Neacht: his son; the 96th Monarch.
80. Fergus Fairgé: his son; had a brother named Baoisgne, who was the father of Cubhall [Coole], who was the father of Fionn, commonly called "Finn MacCoole," the illustrious general in the third century of the ancient Irish Militia known as the Fiana Eirionn, or "Fenians of Ireland."
81. Ros: son of Fergus Fairgé.
82. Fionn Filé ("filé:" Irish, a poet): his son.
83. Conchobhar Abhraoidhruaidh: his son; the 99th Monarch of Ireland.
84. Mogh Corb: his son.
85. Cu-Corb : his son; King of Leinster.
86. Niadh [nia] Corb: his son.
87. Cormac Gealtach: his son. Had a brother named Ceathramhadh.
88. Felim Fiorurglas: his son.
89. Cathair Mór, Monarch of Ireland: son of Felim Fiorurglas. Had amongst other children: 1. Ros Failgeach, from whom descended the O'Connor (Faley); 2. Daire, ancestor of O'Gorman; 3. Comthanan, ancestor of Duff, of Leinster; 4. Curigh, who was slain by Fionn MacCumhal (Finn MacCoole); 5. a daughter, Landabaria, who, according to the Ogygia, p. 315, was the third wife of the (110th) Irish Monarch Conn Ceadcathach (or Conn of the Hundred Battles), who succeeded Cathair Mór in the Monarchy; 6. Fiacha Baicheda.
Curigh, No. 4 here mentioned, who was slain by Fionn MacCumhal, had a son named Slectaire; and a daughter named Uchdelbh (or Uchdamhuil), who was wife of Fionn Fothart, a son of Conn of the Hundred Battles. This Slectaire, son of Curigh, had a daughter Corcraine, who was the mother of Diarmid Ua Duibhne, and of Oscar, son of Oissin.
90. Fiacha Baicheda: youngest son of Cathair Mór; d. 220.
91. Breasal Bealach ("bealach:" Irish, large-lipped): his son; a quo O'Bealaigh, anglicised Bailey, Bailie, Baily, Bayly, and Bewley. Was the second Christian King of Leinster.
92. Labhradh: son of Breasal Bealach, the second Christian King of Leinster; had two sons:
I. Eanna Ceannsalach.
II. Deagh, a quo Ui Deagha Mór; in Hy - Cinnselach.
93. Eanna Ceannsalach: elder son of Labhradh; mar. Conang; was called Ceann - Salach (unclean head) by Cednathech the Druid, whom he slew at Cruachan Cleanta (Croghan Hill, in the King's County), where Eanna defeated Eochaidh Muigh Meadhoin (Eochy Moyvone), the Monarch, A.D. 365. Had issue:
I. Feidhlimidh (or Felim).
II. Eochu (or Eochaidh) Ceannsalach, who was exiled to Scotland by the Irish Monarch Niall of the Nine Hostages, whom said Eochu assassinated near Boulogne, on the river Leor (now the Lianne).
III. Crimthann Cass, of whom presently.
IV. Earc.
V. Aongus.
VI. Conal.
VII. Trian.
VIII. Cairpre.
94. Felim: son of Eanna Cinsealach; had a brother named Deadhach, who was the ancestor of O'Dea and Day, of Leinster.
95. Aonghus: son of Felim.
96. Muredach (a quo O'Muiredaigh, of Leinster; anglicised Murray): his son; had a brother named Uargus, who was the ancestor of Duncan, or Dunkin, of the Line of Heremon.
97. Eochaidh, King of Leinster: son of Muredach; fled to Scotland. He had two brothers - 1. Alioll, who was the ancestor of Maconky; and 2. Eoghan (Owen), who was the ancestor of O'Harraghtan of Leinster.
98. Brandubh: son of Eochaidh; the tenth Christian King of Leinster; A.D. 594.
99. Cineth: his son; had a brother named Seicne (or Seigin), who was the ancestor of O'Murphy of Hy-Felimy.
100. Donal: son of Cineth.
101. Alioll: his son; a quo "Rath Alioll."
102. Dubhlaodh ("dubh:" Irish, black; "laodh," a calf): his son; a quo O'Dublaoidh (by some written O'Dunlaing, and anglicised Dowling).
103. Cucoille: his son.
104. Alioll (2): his son.
105. Maolsaraan: his son.
106. Onchu: his son.
107. Flann: his son.
108. Maoluradh: his son.
109. Alioll (3): his son.
110. Dubhlaodh (2): his son.
111. Dubh ("dubh:" Irish, darkfeatured, great, prodigious, burned; Heb., "dobhe") his son; a quo O'Duibhe, anglicised O'Deevy, and modernized Devoy, Duff, Duffe; had a brother named Donough, who was the ancestor of Connulay.
112. Solomon: son of Dubh.
113. Padraic: his son.
114. Gillchriosd: his son.
115. Padraic (2): his son.
116. Gillchriosd from whom descend the O'Dowlings of today.